26 Sep

Author Spotlight! Dr. Jolene Pearson

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Jolene Pearson, Ph.D., IMH-E® (IV), holds a Ph.D. in Curriculum and Instruction from the University of Minnesota. She earned a B.S. degree from the University of Minnesota in Child Development, and an M.S. degree in Early Childhood from Wheelock College in Massachusetts. Jolene is an Associate Professor and the Director of the Early Childhood Education program at Bethel University in St. Paul, Minnesota.  She has been an adjunct faculty member and instructor at the University of Minnesota, the University of St. Thomas, and St. Cloud State University, teaching courses in parent education, infant mental health, and early childhood special education. Dr. Pearson is a certified Neonatal Behavioral Assessment Scale examiner and holds licenses in the fields of Parent Education, Early Childhood Education, and Early Childhood Special Education.

infant pearsonJolene authored and has taught the CEED online courses Parent-Infant Pathways: An Educator’s Guide to Providing Information and Support to New Parents and Premature Babies and Their Parents: Information and Insights for Early Intervention Personnel. Her new book (2016), published by Zero to Three, is entitled: Pathways to Positive Parenting: Helping Parents Nurture Healthy Development in the Earliest Months.

I had the opportunity to ask Dr. Pearson a few questions about the book to bring you a closer look at this wonderful resource. TUNE IN HERE!

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October Journal Author Spotlight Webinar
Pathways to Positive Parenting:
Helping Parents Nurture Healthy Development in the Earliest Months

Thursday, October 6, 2016
12:00-12:45 p.m. EDT
*FREE for ZERO TO THREE members!


22 Feb

Mondays with M.E.: STEP FAMILY RELATIONSHIPS

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SURVIVING AND THRIVING IN STEP FAMILY RELATIONSHIPS: A STEP PARENT CONVERSATION WITH DR. PATRICIA PAPERNOW

Papernow,Patricia_book2Becoming a step family is a huge transition for everyone involved. What are the common emotional issues for children when a parent marries and how can all the adults pull together to help children adapt in a healthy way? What is the appropriate role for a step parent when it comes to discipline? How do families avoid unnecessary competition or disagreement between step parent and birth parent? Dr. Patricia Papernow has focused on step family relationships throughout her career, and she is step-mom to three adult children and step grandma to six. She brings realism, sensitivity and wisdom to this fascinating discussion with Marti & Erin! >>TUNE IN HERE<<

Are you a step parent or do you have a step parent? What has been good about your experience and what has been difficult? Based on what Dr. Papernow said in this Mom Enough discussion, what might have helped you and your family face some of the challenges of being step family? With whom would you like to share this helpful audio show?

For Dr. Papernow’s 7 tips for parenting, step parenting and discipline in stepfamilies, click here.

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This post was created by Mom Enough and used with permission


15 Feb

Mondays with M.E.: BUILDING GOOD ‘FINANCIAL PARENTING’ SKILLS

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IT’S NEVER TOO LATE (OR TOO EARLY!) TO BEGIN

Financial parenting guest Dr. Joyce SeridoMost of us probably know a young adult who has maxed out credit cards, failed to live within a budget, been blindsided by unexpected expenses and gone running home to Mom and Dad for a bailout. And most of us probably hope (or swear) that our kids won’t make those same bad decisions. So, what can we do right now, whatever the ages of our children? Read More


28 Dec

Mondays with M.E.: SUPPORTING YOUR CHILD’S SELF-CONTROL

MomEnough_logo_notag-300x60A CONVERSATION WITH U OF MN RESEARCHER DR. STEPHANIE CARLSON

Carlson,Stephanie_hsWhat researchers call “executive function” and most parents call “self-control” encompasses everything from paying attention in class to resisting the impulse to punch someone who gets in your space to managing frustration with a difficult project. However it shows up in daily life, executive function is key to school success and positive relationships. So how does executive function develop in children and what role do we play as parents in promoting good executive function? Dr. Stephanie Carlson, professor in the University of Minnesota’s Institute of Child Development (College of Education and Human Development), has been studying this important aspect of child development and brings helpful insights and practical tips to her discussion with Marti and Erin in this week’s Mom Enough show. TUNE IN HERE!

Whatever the ages of your children, what examples do you see of their growing “executive function” or self-control? In what situations do your children seem to lack (or struggle with) self-control? Based on what you heard in this Mom Enough discussion, describe two or three things you could do to support your children’s development of executive function. Comment/Reply below.

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This post was created by Mom Enough and used with permission


7 Dec

Mondays with M.E.: YOUTH SPORTS PARENTS

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BEING THE BEST YOUTH SPORTS PARENT YOU CAN BE: WISDOM FROM COACH AND PSYCHOLOGY PROFESSOR JOHN TAUER

Tauer,John_book Sports Parent youthDr. John Tauer is in a relatively unique position as both a coach of one of the winningest basketball teams in the country and a psychology professor who studies motivation at the University of St. Thomas. He doesn’t always like what he sees in youth sports and coined the acronym “WOSP” (well-intentioned, overinvolved sports parents) for his recent book, Why Less Is More for WOSPS: How to Be the Best Sports Parent You Can Be. A big believer in the potential of youth sports to build character, discipline, teamwork and conflict resolution skills, Tauer nonetheless challenges the Read More