15 Jan

Adventures In Eating: Culture Recipe #1

Homemade Chicken Noodle Soup

Homemade chicken noodle soup is part of my culture. I remember eating it as a child and now prepare it for my children. It’s a great meal on a cold day!

Culture Recipe #1

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Mary SchroederMary Schroeder works for the University of Minnesota Extension which helps to connect community needs with University of Minnesota resources.  Specifically the Health and Nutrition programs and resources focus on disease & obesity prevention, healthy school environments, and continuing education for community professionals.  You can link to the Extension Health and Nutrition website at: http://www.extension.umn.edu/health/

Mary Schroeder, MPH, RD, LD
Extension Educator
Health and Nutrition
University of Minnesota Extension
Email:  hedin007@umn.edu
Website:  www.extension.umn.edu
Facebook:  https://www.facebook.com/UMNExtSimplyGoodEating

14 Jan

Adventures in Eating: Cultural Food Tour

cultural food tourGet your passport for flavor ready as you are about to embark on a cultural food tour! Over the next few months, “Adventures in Eating” will be exploring different cultures with a focus on food. By learning more about common foods and food traditions in different cultures, you will be better prepared to meet the needs of students in your classroom or in your care. You can also use the information to introduce children to other parts of the world and traditions outside of their own.

Our “tour guides” will be University of Minnesota Extension SNAP-Ed Educators from the Latino, Hmong, Somali, and Native American cultures. SNAP-Ed Educators help Minnesotans with limited financial resources make the healthy choice the easy. They often work with Head Start teachers or parents with young children.  Each month a different educator will share the following:

  • Foods common to their culture
  • The top 3 things an early childhood educators should know about their culture
  • An easy food or recipe that can be made and eaten by children in the classroom
  • A fun activity or game from their culture
  • A favorite cultural recipes you can prepare at home or share with students’ families.

You can begin the adventure today by thinking about culture. Culture is a way of life of a group of people – their foods, beliefs, values and symbols usually passed on from one generation to the next. What foods and activities are traditional in your culture? How are you introducing different cultures to young children?

Everyone likes to have their culture recognized. One way you can do that is by making parent handouts available in their language. Did you know that the MyPlate Tips for Healthy Eating is available in 19 languages? This is a great resource to share with families when teaching children about healthy eating.

Let the adventure begin!!!

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Mary SchroederMary Schroeder works for the University of Minnesota Extension which helps to connect community needs with University of Minnesota resources.  Specifically the Health and Nutrition programs and resources focus on disease & obesity prevention, healthy school environments, and continuing education for community professionals.  You can link to the Extension Health and Nutrition website at: http://www.extension.umn.edu/health/

Mary Schroeder, MPH, RD, LD
Extension Educator
Health and Nutrition
University of Minnesota Extension
Email:  hedin007@umn.edu
Website:  www.extension.umn.edu
Facebook:  https://www.facebook.com/UMNExtSimplyGoodEating

15 Dec

Adventures in Healthy Eating: Happy Mealtimes

holly-leaves2During the holidays, you may find that your schedules does not allow for consistent mealtimes. As a result, you may have children coming to the table overly hungry (and probably crabby due to hunger) or coming to the table already full as they have snacked on less healthy foods prior to the meal.

As an adult, there are some simple things you can do to keep holiday mealtimes happy for young children.

  1. Aim for consistent mealtimes. If your child typically eats at 11:30 a.m. every day, don’t expect them to wait until 1:00 p.m. to eat if you are out shopping or attending holiday events. Try to plan your schedule so they can eat within an hour of their regular mealtime.
  1. Use healthy snacks. If you know mealtime will be an hour or more past their regular mealtime, plan a small healthy snack at their regular mealtime. Apple slices, carrot sticks, or even half of a peanut butter and jelly sandwich are great options. Keep some dried fruit or crackers in your car so you have a healthy snack if your shopping takes longer than planned. Keep the amount small enough so their hunger is satisfied, but they are still hungry for the family meal.
  1. DSC_2756_221Avoid “grazing” on less healthy foods. Holidays are a great time to enjoy traditional family cookies, fudge, and other sweet foods. It’s important for young children (and adults too) to avoid eating (grazing) on these sweet treats all day. Plan to serve these sweet treats as dessert or a snack. Avoid having a cookie or goodie tray set out all day.

Holidays are a nice time to be with family and friends. Keeping mealtime consistent and providing a variety of fruits and vegetables for snacks will help keep children happy.

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Mary SchroederMary Schroeder works for the University of Minnesota Extension which helps to connect community needs with University of Minnesota resources.  Specifically the Health and Nutrition programs and resources focus on disease & obesity prevention, healthy school environments, and continuing education for community professionals.  You can link to the Extension Health and Nutrition website at: http://www.extension.umn.edu/health/

Mary Schroeder, MPH, RD, LD
Extension Educator
Health and Nutrition
University of Minnesota Extension
Email:  hedin007@umn.edu
Website:  www.extension.umn.edu
Facebook:  https://www.facebook.com/UMNExtSimplyGoodEating