29 Feb

Mondays with M.E.: URO-GYNECOLOGICAL PROBLEMS

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BLADDER LEAKAGE, PELVIC FLOOR ISSUES AND OTHER URO-GYNECOLOGICAL PROBLEMS: A CANDID CONVERSATION WITH DR. BETH FRANKMAN FROM PARK NICOLLET HEALTH SERVICES

For many of us moms, one of the lingering problems after childbirth is bladder leakage when we cough or sneeze or – heaven forbid – jump on a trampoline! Other problems, including prolapsed uterus or, especially as we age, bowel leakage, also may cause discomfort and embarrassment. But, as Dr. Beth Frankman from Park Nicollet Women’s Center explains on Mom Enough, Read More


23 Feb

Beyond The Pages ECE Book Study: Chapter 2 (Week 4)

By Gayle Stuber

Gayle StuberStart with yourself—and consider what you want for the system in which you work.

What would you keep? What would you change in this system?

Field of Practice: the purpose of the field in question revolves around performance of a specialized and shared competence.  A ‘field’ is an invisible world filled with mediums of connections: an invisible structure that connects.

I have read and re-read both Chapter 1 and 2 to get started on this discussion—or, to use the author’s words, dialogue.  Chapter 2 is truly a way to begin the reflection needed—in a collective manner!—first individually and then, Read More


22 Feb

ECE Book Study/Conversation Timeline

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In case you missed it, here’s the Book Study Timeline! Be sure to visit the FAQs pageNote that you may begin the study/conversation at any time! *Must participate (comment) in all 8 weeks to receive a certificate of completion.

(click on chapter or name below to access that content)

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22 Feb

Mondays with M.E.: STEP FAMILY RELATIONSHIPS

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SURVIVING AND THRIVING IN STEP FAMILY RELATIONSHIPS: A STEP PARENT CONVERSATION WITH DR. PATRICIA PAPERNOW

Papernow,Patricia_book2Becoming a step family is a huge transition for everyone involved. What are the common emotional issues for children when a parent marries and how can all the adults pull together to help children adapt in a healthy way? What is the appropriate role for a step parent when it comes to discipline? How do families avoid unnecessary competition or disagreement between step parent and birth parent? Dr. Patricia Papernow has focused on step family relationships throughout her career, and she is step-mom to three adult children and step grandma to six. She brings realism, sensitivity and wisdom to this fascinating discussion with Marti & Erin! >>TUNE IN HERE<<

Are you a step parent or do you have a step parent? What has been good about your experience and what has been difficult? Based on what Dr. Papernow said in this Mom Enough discussion, what might have helped you and your family face some of the challenges of being step family? With whom would you like to share this helpful audio show?

For Dr. Papernow’s 7 tips for parenting, step parenting and discipline in stepfamilies, click here.

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This post was created by Mom Enough and used with permission


18 Feb

Beyond The Pages ECE Book Study: Chapter 2 Continued (Week 3)

By Jill Bella

Jill Bella ECE book study

Well, as promised, I am checking in and taking the book group in a slightly different direction. You’ve raised concerns and offered insights into both professionalizing ECE as a field of practice and not doing so. You’ve highlighted the disparity among wages between early care and education teachers and state licensed teachers. There have been various suggestions for how to go about professionalizing the field—from credentialing to using assessment tools that measure teaching practices. Some of you have challenged us to take this conversation outward. So I am asking you now to first reflect on your own activity related to your opinion on professionalizing ECE as a field of practice.

Close your eyes and take a moment to think about Read More


16 Feb

Beyond The Pages ECE Book Study: Chapter 2 (Week 3)

By Jill Bella

Jill Bella ECE

This past summer I attended a conference session facilitated by Stacie Goffin and several others on the topic of this book. Ten minutes into the session, two women at my table got up and left. When it came time for the participants to discuss some provocative questions about professionalizing the field, it was revealed by their remaining colleague that the two women had left because they were upset when Stacie had made a comment suggesting early childhood education (ECE) was not a professional field of practice. I was baffled. Didn’t they realize that early childhood education does not meet the definition of a professional field of practice? Did they misinterpret Stacie’s message as demeaning their work instead of trying to change the way it is valued for the better? Were they threatened by what professionalizing the field might mean for them personally? While I will never know the exact reason Stacie’s comment caused them to leave, their reaction frightened me. This session was billed as a provocative discussion, and if, as practitioners in our field we are that quick to dismiss or avoid a discussion that challenges our beliefs and attitudes, then our work to advance early childhood education might be even more difficult than I had already imagined.

This is why Chapter 2 in Stacie’s book is so critical. Titled “Thinking Alone,” this chapter provides an important method for demystifying our views about professionalizing the field. It contains a series of questions designed for self-reflection to get to the core of our assumptions, assess our commitment to change, evaluate our open mindedness, and dissect our conversational style so we are not a passenger of our thoughts and previous behaviors but rather a driver, determining what our thoughts and actions will be. Honestly and openly addressing these questions will make us more likely to “stay at the table” when challenged and motivate us to move the conversation to a new space rather than halting it.

I’d like us to use this week in our book group as a place to first surface those often unspoken barriers that we don’t always want to admit, but that shape our actions. Your responses may provide valuable information for future conversations around the country by those invested in re-conceptualizing ECE. Second, I want to use the list generated to dig deeper. My intent for this week is to facilitate a continuing discussion with several parts; giving you time to reflect on your responses and the responses of your fellow book group members, and then taking the conversation further. As a result, you haven’t seen the last of me! This first question allows you the opportunity to be part of the conversation—this book group is a way to explore ideas and voice opinions that will stimulate the thoughts of others. In a sense, this is a step toward Chapter 4, “Supporting Successful Conversations with Intent” and a mark of advocacy.  As a practitioner in early childhood education, you have a perspective and an opinion that can help shape the future.

Take a moment to list what might be at stake personally and professionally if early childhood education is restructured as a field of practice. I’ll begin with a few ideas that could have huge implications:

–          If qualifications are increased, many practitioners might not meet newly required qualifications

–          If qualifications are increased, the field could lose those good practitioners with low formal qualifications

–          If practitioners are licensed or certified, the cost may add another burden to an already financially challenged group

What do you think might be at stake if we restructure ECE as a field of practice? I will check in and facilitate more book group discussion as the week continues.

-Jill
Director, Quality Supports and Assistant Professor
(800) 443-5522, Ext. 5059
jill.bella@nl.edu
@JillMBella

*New here? You can find all the book study details HERE. Happy reading!

This book study is sponsored by Redleaf Press

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BeyondthePages ECE book Study


15 Feb

Mondays with M.E.: BUILDING GOOD ‘FINANCIAL PARENTING’ SKILLS

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IT’S NEVER TOO LATE (OR TOO EARLY!) TO BEGIN

Financial parenting guest Dr. Joyce SeridoMost of us probably know a young adult who has maxed out credit cards, failed to live within a budget, been blindsided by unexpected expenses and gone running home to Mom and Dad for a bailout. And most of us probably hope (or swear) that our kids won’t make those same bad decisions. So, what can we do right now, whatever the ages of our children? Read More